Mutata corpora: Ovid's Changing Forms and the Metamorphic Bodies of Pantomime Dancing

TitoloMutata corpora: Ovid's Changing Forms and the Metamorphic Bodies of Pantomime Dancing
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsLada-Richards, I
Ancient AuthorsPublius Ovidius Naso (PHI 0959)
JournalTransactions of the American Philological Association
Volume143
Issue1
Pagination105-152
Abstract

This article reads Ovid's foregrounding of the human body in the Metamorphoses side by side with the most flamboyant public discourse of Augustan Rome where the body was similarly privileged as a medium of communication, namely pantomime dancing, an expression-filled dance form predicated on the mute delineation of character and passion. Ovid's body-centered poetic vision is informed by the haunting materiality of the staged, dancing body, whose electrifying language had a searing effect on his literary imagination. Reading the Metamorphoses through the lens of pantomime dancing illuminates the profound, albeit underexplored, symbiosis of dance and poetry in Augustan Rome. [http://muse.jhu.edu/article/506851]

DOI10.1353/apa.2013.0001

Informazioni

© 2007-2012 MOISA: Società internazionale per lo studio della musica greca e romana e della sua eredità culturale.

Sito disegnato da Geoff Piersol a aggiornato da Stefan Hagel